Jewish Foods

Home | About Us | Submit a Recipe | New Recipes | Links
Kosher Grocery Store | Kitchenware | Judaica | Free Offer | Sale | Search Jewish Foods

Jewish Foods

Jewish Recipes
Kosher Recipes
  Jewish Cooking Terms
Jewish Foods
Jewish Spices
  Jewish Cookbooks
Dairy
Meat
  Parve
  Baba Ganoush
  Bagels
Blintz
Challah
  Charoset
  Cholent
  Etrog
  Farfel
  Falafel
  Gefilte Fish
  Hamantaschen
  Hummus
  Jewish Holidays
  Knish
  Kosher Recipes
  Kosher Wines
  Kugel
  Latkes
  Lox (salmon)
  Matzah
  Pita
  Sufganiya
  Tzimmes

Jewish Cooking

  Judaica
Kitchenware
Kosher Symbols
What is Kosher ?
What is a hechsher?

Page Options

Send

Jewish Recipes: Copyright - Disclaimer

Add us to your favorites

|

Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Fruits

In botany, a fruit is the ripened ovary—together with seeds—of a flowering plant. In many species, the fruit incorporates the ripened ovary and surrounding tissues. Fruits are the means by which flowering plants disseminate seeds.   Evolution has led plants to adopt certain basic mechanisms, seemingly without close regard to the tissues involved.

No one terminology really fits the enormous variety that is found among plant fruits. Botanical terminology for fruits is inexact and will remain so.

List of Fruit Recipes

Apples
Apricots
Avocado
Figs
shesek
Strawberries
Pears
Pomegranates
watermelon

In cuisine, when discussing fruit as food, the term usually refers to just those plant fruits that are sweet and fleshy, examples of which include plum, apple and orange. However, a great many common vegetables, as well as nuts and grains, are the fruit of the plant species they come from.

The term false fruit (pseudocarp, accessory fruit) is sometimes applied to a fruit like the fig (a multiple-accessory fruit; see below) or to a plant structure that resembles a fruit but is not derived from a flower or flowers. Some gymnosperms, such as yew, have fleshy arils that resemble fruits and some junipers have berry-like, fleshy cones.

With most fruits pollination is a vital part of fruit culture, and the lack of knowledge of pollinators and pollenizers can contribute to poor crops or poor quality crops. In a few species, the fruit may develop in the absence of pollination/fertilization, a process known as parthenocarpy. Such fruits are seedless. A plant that does not produce fruit is known as acarpous, meaning essentially "without fruit".