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Jewish Recipes --> Jewish and Israeli Foods --> Jewish and Kosher Cuisine

The Jewish cuisine has been formed both by the dietary laws of kashrut / Torah ("keeping kosher") and the many cultures in which Jews have traveled.

Jewish cuisine has influences from the cuisines of the Balkans, Galicia, Russia, Spain, Portugal and the Middle East.

For example, there are a number of cold starters which originate in the Middle East and which were brought by the Turks to the Balkans. [read more]

Jewish Foods By : Emil G. Hirsch Wilhelm Nowack Solomon Schechter Samuel Krauss

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Bialy

Brisket

Cel-Ray

Chametz Chamin Corned beef
Dondurma Gribines ( Grivines, Gribens) Halva
Jaffa Orange Karpas Kishka
Knaidlach Krembo  
Kreplach Lokshen Soup Macaroon
Matzah balls Nunt Pastrami
Schmaltz Sladko Smoked Meat

The roots of Jewish cooking, however, are in the Middle East, where the Jews came from, and it was heavily influenced by the cuisine of Ancient Egypt and the Byzantine Empire. It has been suggested, for example, that the major role played by garlic, leek and onions in Jewish cooking is due to these influences. Arab and Moorish cooking had an equal influence on the Jewish cuisine.

At the same time, aspects of Jewish cooking were often adopted by the cultures in which they lived. The rose jam which is typical of Russian and Galician cookery, for example, may have originally been imported by Jews during the golden age of Jewish culture in Spain.

As other Semitic peoples, the Jews have dietary laws; the basic laws of kashrut are in the Biblical book of Leviticus. Food not in accord with Jewish law is termed treifah or treif (טרפה) ("torn"); according to Orthodox and Conservative Judaism, Jews are only allowed to eat kosher.

Sept 2005 - Sept 2013
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Bagels.